animus-inviolabilis:

Psyché-Pomone

Auguste Rodin (1886?)
Executed by Louis Mathet (1904-1906)

(via intraoculus)

lvndcity:

Untitled by Silvia Sala (2013)
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Venice, Italy

lvndcity:

Untitled by Silvia Sala (2013)

Facebook | Tumblr | Blog | Twitter | 500px

Venice, Italy

(Source: cerceos, via intraoculus)

metaphorformetaphor:

[…] I love the past, the dark of it,
The weight of it teaching us nothing, the loss of it, the all
Of it asking for nothing, 

Mark Strand, from “I Will Love the Twenty-First Century,” New and Selected Poems (Alfred A. Knopf, 2009)

(via memoryslandscape)

likeafieldmouse:

Hervé Guibert (1955-1991) - The Mausoleum of Lovers

(via brownrosy)

queertrees:

geekygothgirl:

verycuriousnocure:

During World War II, Josephine Baker served with the French Red Cross and was an active member of the French resistance movement. Using her career as a cover Baker became an intelligence agent, carrying secret messages written in invisible ink on her sheet music. She was awarded the Croix de Guerre, and received a Medal of the Resistance in 1946. In 1961 she received the highest French honor, the Legion d’Honneur awarded by then President Charles de Gaulle.
Our loss, U.S.A….

If you don’t admire the shit out of J. Baker, who was also pretty openly bisexual and adopted NINETEEN children in addition to the badassery mentioned above, I want you to go sit in the corner and think about your life choices.

um she was also a huge civil rights activist and her refusal to perform for segregated audiences at major clubs that were fallin over themselves to book her helped de-segregate vegas performance venues
aaaand she had a pet cheetah

queertrees:

geekygothgirl:

verycuriousnocure:

During World War II, Josephine Baker served with the French Red Cross and was an active member of the French resistance movement. Using her career as a cover Baker became an intelligence agent, carrying secret messages written in invisible ink on her sheet music. She was awarded the Croix de Guerre, and received a Medal of the Resistance in 1946. In 1961 she received the highest French honor, the Legion d’Honneur awarded by then President Charles de Gaulle.

Our loss, U.S.A….

If you don’t admire the shit out of J. Baker, who was also pretty openly bisexual and adopted NINETEEN children in addition to the badassery mentioned above, I want you to go sit in the corner and think about your life choices.

um she was also a huge civil rights activist and her refusal to perform for segregated audiences at major clubs that were fallin over themselves to book her helped de-segregate vegas performance venues

aaaand she had a pet cheetah

(via penthesileas)

discardingimages:

reading clericCodex Justinianus, Bologna 13th century.
Angers, Bibliothèque municipale, ms. 339, fol. 260v

Wowzas

discardingimages:

reading cleric

Codex Justinianus, Bologna 13th century.

Angers, Bibliothèque municipale, ms. 339, fol. 260v

Wowzas

"Underneath all reason lies delirium, and drift"

Gilles Deleuze, Desert Islands (via differenceetrepetition)

(Source: blackadiaphane, via lifeinpoetry)

copenfuckinghagen:

Cycling is sociable. Ran into my friend Sille and her dog Frida yesterday #copenhagen

copenfuckinghagen:

Cycling is sociable. Ran into my friend Sille and her dog Frida yesterday #copenhagen

(via areasonablydressedwoman)

beatonna:

Did someone call for me?
Go read those Broadsides!

beatonna:

Did someone call for me?

Go read those Broadsides!

humansofnewyork:

"I have a doctorate in Buddhist philosophy. Now I want to learn as many languages as possible so I can teach as many people as possible.""What do you think is the most important thing that people can learn from Buddhism?""Compassion. Everyone suffers and everyone needs happiness."
(Dharamshala, India)

humansofnewyork:

"I have a doctorate in Buddhist philosophy. Now I want to learn as many languages as possible so I can teach as many people as possible."
"What do you think is the most important thing that people can learn from Buddhism?"
"Compassion. Everyone suffers and everyone needs happiness."

(Dharamshala, India)

(via avneutrois)

"It is a nostalgic time right now, and photographs actively promote nostalgia. Photography is an elegiac art, a twilight art. Most subjects photographed are, just by virtue of being photographed, touched with pathos. An ugly or grotesque subject may be moving because it has been dignified by the attention of the photographer. A beautiful subject can be the object of rueful feelings, because it has aged or decayed or no longer exists. All photographs are memento mori. To take a photograph is to participate in another person’s (or thing’s) mortality, vulnerability, mutability. Precisely by slicing out this moment and freezing it, all photographs testify to time’s relentless melt."

Susan Sontag, ‘In Plato’s Cave’, in On Photography (via funeral-wreaths)

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
As the Tate writes, John Roddam Spencer Stanhope’s 1864 painting “The Wine Press may be understood as an example of Biblical typology, a form of symbolism, revived in the nineteenth century, in which divinely intended prefigurements of Christ’s passion and Crucifixion were identifiable in the events of the Old Testament.”
The wine press (mentioned in the Isaiah 63:3) makes for a rich comparison between Old Testament and New. Wine is, of course, a traditional symbol for the blood of Christ. The Isaiah verses also describe a redemptive destruction—but a wrathful trampling of man by God. The asymmetry of the parallel in some ways heightens it: the Tate quotes George Landow as writing that “Christ, who is both victim and conqueror, treads the winepress and is crushed by it.”
The more literal wine press in the painting also holds interest, though. A large lever press—perhaps based on a design described by Pliny the Elder in the first century—the vertical screw ought to bring the lever down on the grapes.
However, it doesn’t look like the lever could ever reach the grapes—and if it could, it’s probably not big enough to do any good.
In fact, the only purpose it looks like it’s up to is the one it currently serves: framing Stanhope’s composition.

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

As the Tate writes, John Roddam Spencer Stanhope’s 1864 painting “The Wine Press may be understood as an example of Biblical typology, a form of symbolism, revived in the nineteenth century, in which divinely intended prefigurements of Christ’s passion and Crucifixion were identifiable in the events of the Old Testament.”

The wine press (mentioned in the Isaiah 63:3) makes for a rich comparison between Old Testament and New. Wine is, of course, a traditional symbol for the blood of Christ. The Isaiah verses also describe a redemptive destruction—but a wrathful trampling of man by God. The asymmetry of the parallel in some ways heightens it: the Tate quotes George Landow as writing that “Christ, who is both victim and conqueror, treads the winepress and is crushed by it.”

The more literal wine press in the painting also holds interest, though. A large lever press—perhaps based on a design described by Pliny the Elder in the first century—the vertical screw ought to bring the lever down on the grapes.

However, it doesn’t look like the lever could ever reach the grapes—and if it could, it’s probably not big enough to do any good.

In fact, the only purpose it looks like it’s up to is the one it currently serves: framing Stanhope’s composition.

(via penthesileas)

poetrysociety:

Anne Bradstreet (born Anne Dudley; who died September 16, 1672) was the first poet and first female writer in the British North American colonies to be published. 

poetrysociety:

Anne Bradstreet (born Anne Dudley; who died September 16, 1672) was the first poet and first female writer in the British North American colonies to be published. 

vintagermwc:

1905 postcard, via eBay.

vintagermwc:

1905 postcard, via eBay.

tamorapierce:

archiemcphee:

This stunning installation of 888,246 red ceramic poppies was created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper in commemoration of the centennial of Britain’s involvement in World War I. Entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, each flower represents a British or Colonial military fatality.

This staggering installation is a work in progress, with the ceramic pippies being planted by volunteers in the dry moat that surrounds the Tower of London. The planting process began a few weeks ago and will continue throughout the summer until a final flower is symbolically planted on November 11, 2014.

Visit the Historic Royal Palaces website to learn more about this moving project. You can also follow the progress of the volunteer planters by following the #TowerPoppies on Twitter.

[via Colossal]

World War One began one hundred years ago this year.

The world was never the same.

The poppy represents the fallen soldier in general and the soldiers of WWI in particular, after the poem, “In Flanders Fields.”

(via fuckyeahthehistoryboys)