woodburning:

I’ve just purchased this lovely Stag’s head tie from Lissom & Muster. 

woodburning:

I’ve just purchased this lovely Stag’s head tie from Lissom & Muster

(Source: unclefather, via avneutrois)

theballoonofthemind:

“Is the scene always visual? It can be aural, the frame can be linguistic: I can fall in love with a sentence spoken to me: and not only because it says something which manages to touch my desire, but because of its syntactical turn (framing), which will inhabit me like a memory.”

—Roland Barthes, from A Lover’s Discourse (Hill and Wang, 1979) 

(Source: textture, via memoryslandscape)

booksnbuildings:

Mont-Saint-Michel, Normandy (France)
Exterior view, from south east
+

booksnbuildings:

Mont-Saint-Michel, Normandy (France)

Exterior view, from south east

+

coisasdetere:

English Country Homes 1830/1900.

coisasdetere:

English Country Homes 1830/1900.

(via woodburning)

"Autumnal language: fullness and falling
away from the tree of self,"

Gregory Orr, from section 3 of “The Tree,” in The Caged Owl: New & Selected Poems (Copper Canyon Press, 2002)

(Source: apoetreflects)

(Source: ocular-splendor, via fukingly)

uispeccoll:

houghtonlib:

Dürer, Albrecht, 1471-1528. Vnderweysung der Messung, mit dem Zirckel vn̄ Richtscheyt, in Linien ebnen vnnd gantzen Corporen, 1525.

Typ 520.25.340

Houghton Library, Harvard University

Typography!  Dürer!

(via cosmictypewriter)

art-is-art-is-art:

The Melancholy Spirit, Franz von Stuck

art-is-art-is-art:

The Melancholy Spirit, Franz von Stuck

(via intraoculus)

jeannepompadour:

Brass tomb effigies of William Bagot and wife Margaret, St. John the Baptist, Baginton, Warwickshire, 1407

jeannepompadour:

Brass tomb effigies of William Bagot and wife Margaret, St. John the Baptist, Baginton, Warwickshire, 1407

(via intraoculus)

jeannepompadour:

Parascheva of the Balkans, 17th century Russian icon

jeannepompadour:

Parascheva of the Balkans, 17th century Russian icon

(via intraoculus)

jeannepompadour:

"The Unicorns" by Gustave Moreau, c. 1885

(via intraoculus)

eush:

Found this on Twitter, thought I’d share because this is my new favorite Latin joke (yeah I have favorite Latin jokes deal with it)

eush:

Found this on Twitter, thought I’d share because this is my new favorite Latin joke (yeah I have favorite Latin jokes deal with it)

(via mountparnassus)

poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

plants and creatures from zakariya al-qazwini’s cosmography “marvels of creatures and the strange things existing”.

(Source: , via mirousworlds)

uispeccoll:

Robert May (1588?-1664) was one of very few cooks in England who received extensive training in English and French training (and even some Spanish and Italian). May was the son of Edward May the cook for the Dormers of Ascott Park, a wealthy Catholic family.  “W.W.,” May’s biographer, believed that it was the Dormers’ and his father’s influence that led to May studying cookery in France for five years. After his training, May worked with his father and cooked for the Dormers. He was chef to a numer of other Catholic families within the Dormers’ social circle as well.

May’s biography prefaces his book, The accomplisht cook, or, The art & mystery of cookery. May included incredibly detailed descriptions on how to prepare flesh, fowl, fish, or any other manner of à-la-mode curiosities.  The book includes small woodcuts throughout, but the most exciting features are the fold out diagrams for making all manner of pies.  Two whole chapters are dedicated to the many ways to make pies! If you are making a fish pie the crust better show the shape of the fish you are preparing!

-Jillian (who now wishes she had found this book before making her first pie last weekend)

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